September 2013


Fracking is bad. There is no other way to look at it. Future generations will wonder what was wrong with us and there is nothing to say. I mean we are compounding our problems instead of our interests. That is definitely not the way things should go.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/6-more-people-found-alive-105324528.html

6 more people found alive, well after Colo. floods

In remarkable turn, 6 more people found OK after Colorado floods; 1 other presumed dead

 

DENVER (AP) — The final six people who were unaccounted for after massive flooding in Colorado have been found safe and well, authorities said Tuesday, but new spills were reported in water-damaged oilfields.

Only one person remained missing and presumed dead. Eight deaths have been confirmed.

It was a remarkable outcome after a disaster that damaged or destroyed nearly 2,000 homes, washed out hundreds of miles of roads and left many small mountain towns completely cut off.

In the early days of the flooding, more than 1,200 people were listed as unaccounted for, but the list shrank quickly as people checked in after they were evacuated.

Meanwhile, the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission said three new spills totaling at least 7,600 gallons had been discovered as flood waters recede. Regulators are now tracking 11 notable leaks totaling at least 34,500 gallons, mostly from storage tanks that toppled or otherwise failed.

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Go there and read. More next week.

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My cousins Matt and Andy live in Boulder and my bestest friends Julie and Wayne live in the flood basin out near Frederick. Neither is in any danger, but life has become inconvenient for them all. Bottle water is hard to find. I do not drink the stuff because it is environmentally stupid and a landfill threat but some people drink nothing else. Wayne has to call the State Police before he sets off for work at night to make sure he can get through. But nobody is talking about the pollution this flooding is spreading.

And now they are saying in Weld County that a pipeline has broken and they have to idea what is leaking out. The pictures from this piece make me sick to my stomach.

http://www.texassharon.com/2013/09/15/is-there-a-media-blackout-on-the-fracking-flood-disaster-in-colorado/

Is there a media blackout on the fracking flood disaster in Colorado?

 

by TXsharon on September 15, 2013

See update below before trying to post a comment.

 

I will update this post as residents send me pictures and video.

 

We need the national news stations to go cover the environmental disaster that’s happening in Colorado right now.

This picture taken by a resident is from yesterday:

>>Picture omitted<<

From an email.

 

I see you’ve noticed the underwater wells in Weld County, Colorado. Amazing; we’ve emailed the Denver TV stations, other media, and state and local politicians. We’ve sent pictures that our members have taken. It’s like the media and politicians have been TOLD not to say anything about it. There has been no mention of the gas wells on the Denver newscasts either last night or this evening although all stations have had extensive and extended flood coverage. You can see underwater wells in the background of some of the newscast videos, and yet the reporters say absolutely nothing.

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Go there and read. More next week.

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I know, I know. The comments in the title are sexist, xenophobic, and take advantage of language differences which border on the obscene, but I made you LOOK didn’t I. Any improvement in wind turbines is good news for the world.

 http://uk.news.yahoo.com/dong-launches-wind-turbine-demo-project-britain-093643593–sector.html#PEqa6aI

Dong launches wind turbine demo project in Britain

LONDON (Reuters) – Dong Energy launched a project on Thursday to test two new giant offshore turbines at its wind farm off England’s Essex coast, marking a step forward in the next generation of wind turbine technology.

Energy minister Greg Barker opened the extension to Dong’s 172-megawatt (MW) Gunfleet Sands wind farm, off Clacton-on-Sea. The 6-MW turbines were supplied by Siemens.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) said the turbines have the potential significantly to cut the cost of producing renewable energy from offshore wind.

The turbines will be tested to help Dong understand how the technology could be rolled out in future British projects.

Last year, Danish state-owned oil and gas group Dong agreed to buy 300 giant offshore wind turbines with a total capacity of 1,800 MW from Siemens for its British wind farms.

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Go there and read. More next week.

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The terms he uses are different. Man has always extracted things. A  good case can be made that for much of our species existence we have caused things to go extinct as well. We need to quit both. The human race could survive off our garbage dumps from here to eternity if we just made product loops that left no waste. That is if we treated everything and everybody for their intrinsic value.

That last sentence is a little shaky but that is because we live in a throw away culture.

http://steadystate.org/the-end-of-the-age-of-extraction/

The End of the Age of Extraction

by Brent Blackwelder

BlackwelderToday’s global economy is causing shortages of natural resources (both renewable and nonrenewable) as we come to the end of what might be called the Age of Extraction. A true cost, steady state economy, on the other hand, would prevent resource problems by maintaining population and resource consumption well within the carrying capacity of the planet.

Energy and mineral shortages, along with depletion of forests and fisheries, are driving the extractors and harvesters to evermore remote places. No longer able to find gushing oilfields, vast stands of virgin timber, or waterways teeming with fish, the extraction companies are racing to the farthest reaches of the planet in search of profits.

The end of the Age of Extraction does not mean that such resources will disappear. In his recent book, The Quest, Daniel Yergin describes oil and gas discoveries that he predicts will turn the Western Hemisphere — from Canada to Brazil — into the next Saudi Arabia. But today’s extraction is pursuing fuels that are either dirty or hard to get. We see more pollution, both from accidents and mundane chronic causes, increasingly pushing civilization beyond the carrying capacity of the earth, wiping out more and more species, and accelerating climate destabilization.

Today’s global economic operating system tolerates and even abets severe pollution damages as industries externalize the costs from their books. Scarcity has made some of the most environmentally devastating energy and mining projects “short-term cost effective.” For example, according to price and revenue figures, it’s cost effective to extract oil from tar sands in Alberta, a process that requires huge energy inputs, grotesquely contaminates land and water, and poisons people, fish, and wildlife.

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Go there and read. More tomorrow.

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